BACKGROUND: Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment is a well-known treatment that has been used successfully in a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases. Currently no data are available in the literature about the role of IVIg in the pathogenesis of thromboembolic events in patients with autoimmune blistering diseases refractory to conventional immunosuppressive treatment. AIM: To determine the relationship between IVIg and thromboembolism in patients with autoimmune blistering diseases and to establish a protocol to deal with the thromboembolic risk. METHODS: In our preliminary clinical study, 10 patients with autoimmune blistering diseases underwent IVIg cycles to a total of 133 cycles in all (total number of infusions in the patient group: 399), at a standard dose of 2 g/kg/infusion accompanied by an accurate and a complete clinical and laboratory screening for thromboembolism. Preventive measures, such as hydration before and after IVIg, and administration of 100 mg of acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) or 1000 IU of subcutaneous heparin calcium per day for 3 weeks, were introduced to reduce the thromboembolic risk. RESULTS: Throughout the 2 years of IVIg treatment, no patient developed a superficial and/or deep venous or arterial thrombosis, even though some of the patients had underlying thromboembolic risk factors and had tested positive for some congenital and acquired thrombophilia markers. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that thromboembolic events are uncommon, despite the presence of risk factors. However, as these disorders are very rare and the percentage of nonresponder patients is very low, further investigations are needed to better understand whether IVIg alone is able to trigger these fatal events in blistering disorders.

Analysis of thromboembolic risk related to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment: a preliminary clinical study of 10 patients with autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering diseases

MIGNOGNA, MICHELE DAVIDE;FORTUNA, GIULIO;LEUCI, STEFANIA;RUOPPO, ELVIRA;FEDELE, STEFANO
2009

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment is a well-known treatment that has been used successfully in a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases. Currently no data are available in the literature about the role of IVIg in the pathogenesis of thromboembolic events in patients with autoimmune blistering diseases refractory to conventional immunosuppressive treatment. AIM: To determine the relationship between IVIg and thromboembolism in patients with autoimmune blistering diseases and to establish a protocol to deal with the thromboembolic risk. METHODS: In our preliminary clinical study, 10 patients with autoimmune blistering diseases underwent IVIg cycles to a total of 133 cycles in all (total number of infusions in the patient group: 399), at a standard dose of 2 g/kg/infusion accompanied by an accurate and a complete clinical and laboratory screening for thromboembolism. Preventive measures, such as hydration before and after IVIg, and administration of 100 mg of acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) or 1000 IU of subcutaneous heparin calcium per day for 3 weeks, were introduced to reduce the thromboembolic risk. RESULTS: Throughout the 2 years of IVIg treatment, no patient developed a superficial and/or deep venous or arterial thrombosis, even though some of the patients had underlying thromboembolic risk factors and had tested positive for some congenital and acquired thrombophilia markers. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that thromboembolic events are uncommon, despite the presence of risk factors. However, as these disorders are very rare and the percentage of nonresponder patients is very low, further investigations are needed to better understand whether IVIg alone is able to trigger these fatal events in blistering disorders.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/375791
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