Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to perceive environmental cues and develop appropriate and coordinated responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Considerable progress has been made towards a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant response to a single stress. However, the existence of cross-tolerance to different stressors has proved to have great relevance in the control and regulation of organismal adaptation. Evidence for the involvement of the signal peptide systemin and jasmonic acid in wound-induced salt stress adaptation in tomato has been provided. To further unravel the functional link between plant responses to salt stress and mechanical damage, transgenic tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentumMill.) plants constitutively expressing the prosystemin cDNA have been exposed to a moderate salt stress. Prosystemin over-expression caused a reduction in stomatal conductance. However, in response to salt stress, prosystemin transgenic plants maintained a higher stomatal conductance compared with the wild-type control. Leaf concentrations of abscissic acid (ABA) and proline were lower in stressed transgenic plants compared with their wild-type control, implying that either the former perceived a less stressful environment or they adapted more efficiently to it. Consistently, under salt stress, transgenic plants produced a higher biomass, indicating that a constitutive activation of wound responses is advantageous in saline environment. Comparative gene expression profiling of stress-induced genes suggested that the partial stomatal closure was not mediated by ABA and/or components of the ABA signal transduction pathway. Possible cross-talks between genes involved in wounding and osmotic stress adaptation pathways in tomato are discussed.

Systemin-dependent salinity tolerance in tomato: evidence of specific convergence of abiotic and biotic stress responses

ORSINI, FRANCESCO;CASCONE, PASQUALE;DE PASCALE, STEFANIA;BARBIERI, GIANCARLO;CORRADO, GIANDOMENICO;RAO, ROSA;MAGGIO, ALBINO
2010

Abstract

Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to perceive environmental cues and develop appropriate and coordinated responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Considerable progress has been made towards a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant response to a single stress. However, the existence of cross-tolerance to different stressors has proved to have great relevance in the control and regulation of organismal adaptation. Evidence for the involvement of the signal peptide systemin and jasmonic acid in wound-induced salt stress adaptation in tomato has been provided. To further unravel the functional link between plant responses to salt stress and mechanical damage, transgenic tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentumMill.) plants constitutively expressing the prosystemin cDNA have been exposed to a moderate salt stress. Prosystemin over-expression caused a reduction in stomatal conductance. However, in response to salt stress, prosystemin transgenic plants maintained a higher stomatal conductance compared with the wild-type control. Leaf concentrations of abscissic acid (ABA) and proline were lower in stressed transgenic plants compared with their wild-type control, implying that either the former perceived a less stressful environment or they adapted more efficiently to it. Consistently, under salt stress, transgenic plants produced a higher biomass, indicating that a constitutive activation of wound responses is advantageous in saline environment. Comparative gene expression profiling of stress-induced genes suggested that the partial stomatal closure was not mediated by ABA and/or components of the ABA signal transduction pathway. Possible cross-talks between genes involved in wounding and osmotic stress adaptation pathways in tomato are discussed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/371637
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