Prospective evaluation of the natural course of idiopathic subclinical hypothyroidism in childhood and adolescence. OBJECTIVE: To prospectively evaluate the course of subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) in children and adolescents with no underlying diseases and no risk factors, which might interfere with the progression of SH. DESIGN: Clinical status, thyroid function, and autoimmunity were prospectively evaluated at entry and after 6, 12, and 24 months in 92 young patients (mean age 8.1+/-3.0 years) with idiopathic SH. RESULTS: During the study, mean TSH levels showed a trend toward a progressive decrease while FT(4) levels remained unchanged. Overall, 38 patients normalized their TSH (group A): 16 patients between 6 and 12 months, and 22 patients between 12 and 24 months. Among the remaining 54 patients, the majority maintained TSH within the baseline values (group B), whereas 11 exhibited a further increase in TSH above 10 mU/l (group C). Baseline TSH and FT(4) levels were similar in the patients who normalized TSH, compared with those with persistent hyperthyrotropinemia. Even in the patients of group C, both TSH and FT(4) at entry were not different with respect to those of groups A and B. No patients showed any symptoms of hypothyroidism during follow-up and no changes in both height and body mass index were observed throughout the observation period. CONCLUSIONS: (a) The natural course of TSH values in a pediatric population with idiopathic SH is characterized by a progressive decrease over time; (b) the majority of patients (88%) normalized or maintained unchanged their TSH; and (c) TSH changes were not associated with either FT(4) values or clinical status or auxological parameters.

Prospective evaluation of the natural course of idiopathic subclinical hypothyroidism in childhood and adolescence.

SALERNO, MARIACAROLINA;CAPALBO, DONATELLA;
2009

Abstract

Prospective evaluation of the natural course of idiopathic subclinical hypothyroidism in childhood and adolescence. OBJECTIVE: To prospectively evaluate the course of subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) in children and adolescents with no underlying diseases and no risk factors, which might interfere with the progression of SH. DESIGN: Clinical status, thyroid function, and autoimmunity were prospectively evaluated at entry and after 6, 12, and 24 months in 92 young patients (mean age 8.1+/-3.0 years) with idiopathic SH. RESULTS: During the study, mean TSH levels showed a trend toward a progressive decrease while FT(4) levels remained unchanged. Overall, 38 patients normalized their TSH (group A): 16 patients between 6 and 12 months, and 22 patients between 12 and 24 months. Among the remaining 54 patients, the majority maintained TSH within the baseline values (group B), whereas 11 exhibited a further increase in TSH above 10 mU/l (group C). Baseline TSH and FT(4) levels were similar in the patients who normalized TSH, compared with those with persistent hyperthyrotropinemia. Even in the patients of group C, both TSH and FT(4) at entry were not different with respect to those of groups A and B. No patients showed any symptoms of hypothyroidism during follow-up and no changes in both height and body mass index were observed throughout the observation period. CONCLUSIONS: (a) The natural course of TSH values in a pediatric population with idiopathic SH is characterized by a progressive decrease over time; (b) the majority of patients (88%) normalized or maintained unchanged their TSH; and (c) TSH changes were not associated with either FT(4) values or clinical status or auxological parameters.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Wasniwewska et Salerno 2009 EJE.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 101.54 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
101.54 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/366164
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 43
  • Scopus 90
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 82
social impact