In non-mammalian vertebrates yolk deposition in the oocytes is a hormone-dependent, gender-specific process. Produced by the ovary under gonadotropin stimulation, Estradiol 17-beta (E(2)) plays a key role in the liver synthesis of vitellogenin (VTG) which in turn is taken up by vitellogenic oocytes in the ovary. In many species a negative role in liver synthesis of VTG in females is also played by progesterone. Experimental administration of E(2) induces the expression of the VTG silent gene also in the liver of males of all the species studied. However, the role of the two isoforms of estrogen receptors, ERalpha and beta, in this process is still unclear. In order to elucidate what kind of ER is involved in the liver synthesis of VTG in the lizard Podarcis sicula, we obtained by means of RT-PCR two fragments of 430bp and 130bp from total ovarian mRNA, encoding respectively for ERalpha and ERbeta. Expression analysis of these two specific isoforms of ERs in the liver showed that in non-breeding females, and in wildlife untreated males only ERbeta is expressed. In breeding vitellogenic females and in E(2)-treated males both alpha and beta receptors are expressed. Furthermore, in females experimentally treated with progesterone during the breeding period, expression of ERalpha disappears. Conversely, treatment of females with E(2) in the non-breeding period induces expression of ERalpha. Immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting showed that the presence of irVTG in liver and plasma is always parallel to hepatic expression of ERalpha in all the different experimental conditions. Our data strongly suggest that expression of ERalpha may be necessary for VTG synthesis in Podarcis. The possible modulatory role of ERbeta is also discussed.

Molecular identification of estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) and their differential expression during VTG synthesis in the liver of lizard Podarcis sicula

VERDERAME, MARIAILARIA;LIMATOLA, ERMELINDA
2010

Abstract

In non-mammalian vertebrates yolk deposition in the oocytes is a hormone-dependent, gender-specific process. Produced by the ovary under gonadotropin stimulation, Estradiol 17-beta (E(2)) plays a key role in the liver synthesis of vitellogenin (VTG) which in turn is taken up by vitellogenic oocytes in the ovary. In many species a negative role in liver synthesis of VTG in females is also played by progesterone. Experimental administration of E(2) induces the expression of the VTG silent gene also in the liver of males of all the species studied. However, the role of the two isoforms of estrogen receptors, ERalpha and beta, in this process is still unclear. In order to elucidate what kind of ER is involved in the liver synthesis of VTG in the lizard Podarcis sicula, we obtained by means of RT-PCR two fragments of 430bp and 130bp from total ovarian mRNA, encoding respectively for ERalpha and ERbeta. Expression analysis of these two specific isoforms of ERs in the liver showed that in non-breeding females, and in wildlife untreated males only ERbeta is expressed. In breeding vitellogenic females and in E(2)-treated males both alpha and beta receptors are expressed. Furthermore, in females experimentally treated with progesterone during the breeding period, expression of ERalpha disappears. Conversely, treatment of females with E(2) in the non-breeding period induces expression of ERalpha. Immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting showed that the presence of irVTG in liver and plasma is always parallel to hepatic expression of ERalpha in all the different experimental conditions. Our data strongly suggest that expression of ERalpha may be necessary for VTG synthesis in Podarcis. The possible modulatory role of ERbeta is also discussed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/365694
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