Background and aim. Symptoms overlap has been reported in patients suffering from both dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although this aspect represents a confounding factor for both diagnosis and treatment ofGERDand dyspepsia, there are no data about their prevalence in Italy. Our aimwas to investigate the prevalence and overlap of uninvestigated dyspepsia and GERD symptoms and their overlap in a large population from a rural area in Southern Italy. Material and methods. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires administered directly to 1300 subjects by the investigators. The sample population was extracted from an age- and sex-stratified randomised group of 64370 subjects (aged 18–82 years) living in a rural area of Southern Italy. Subjects were questioned about the presence of acid regurgitation and burning sensation/discomfort rising from the stomach up to the throat. Symptom frequency was calculated based on the occurrence in the previous year (absent; mild: £1/month; moderate: £1/week; severe: >£1/week). Presence and severity (absent, mild, moderate and disabling) of eight dyspeptic symptoms (epigastric pain, postprandial fullness, bloating, early satiety, nausea, vomiting, belching, epigastric burning) were explored. Dyspepsia was then defined according to Rome II criteria. The data were assembled in an Access© database (Microsoft) and analysed with SSPS 11.0. Results. Overall prevalence of GERD symptoms was 22.3%. Patients with GERD symptoms, scored as moderate/severe, were 164 (12.6%), with 111 subjects (8.5%) having burning or discomfort rising from the stomach to the throat and 53 (4.1%) with acid regurgitation. Both symptoms were present in 5.7% of total population. Three hundred seven (23.6%) subjects had dyspeptic symptoms. Based on Rome II criteria, 76 (5.8%) were found to have dyspepsia and 69 of them had also reflux symptoms (23.7% of allGERDsubjects). Furthermore, symptoms association between dyspepsia and GERD was stronger in subjects with moderate/severe GERD symptoms (49/120 versus 20/101, p < 0.01). Conclusions. Our study showed a high prevalence of GERD and dyspepsia symptoms in Italy. Severe GERD and dyspepsia symptoms were present in at least 13 and 6% of patients, respectively, and they overlapped in at least 6% of the subjects. Our data suggest that these patients should be considered as having functional disorders rather than simple GERD.

Prevalence and symptoms overlap between dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a study in a rural population

CUOMO, ROSARIO;SARNELLI, GIOVANNI;DE GIORGI, FRANCESCO;
2005

Abstract

Background and aim. Symptoms overlap has been reported in patients suffering from both dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although this aspect represents a confounding factor for both diagnosis and treatment ofGERDand dyspepsia, there are no data about their prevalence in Italy. Our aimwas to investigate the prevalence and overlap of uninvestigated dyspepsia and GERD symptoms and their overlap in a large population from a rural area in Southern Italy. Material and methods. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires administered directly to 1300 subjects by the investigators. The sample population was extracted from an age- and sex-stratified randomised group of 64370 subjects (aged 18–82 years) living in a rural area of Southern Italy. Subjects were questioned about the presence of acid regurgitation and burning sensation/discomfort rising from the stomach up to the throat. Symptom frequency was calculated based on the occurrence in the previous year (absent; mild: £1/month; moderate: £1/week; severe: >£1/week). Presence and severity (absent, mild, moderate and disabling) of eight dyspeptic symptoms (epigastric pain, postprandial fullness, bloating, early satiety, nausea, vomiting, belching, epigastric burning) were explored. Dyspepsia was then defined according to Rome II criteria. The data were assembled in an Access© database (Microsoft) and analysed with SSPS 11.0. Results. Overall prevalence of GERD symptoms was 22.3%. Patients with GERD symptoms, scored as moderate/severe, were 164 (12.6%), with 111 subjects (8.5%) having burning or discomfort rising from the stomach to the throat and 53 (4.1%) with acid regurgitation. Both symptoms were present in 5.7% of total population. Three hundred seven (23.6%) subjects had dyspeptic symptoms. Based on Rome II criteria, 76 (5.8%) were found to have dyspepsia and 69 of them had also reflux symptoms (23.7% of allGERDsubjects). Furthermore, symptoms association between dyspepsia and GERD was stronger in subjects with moderate/severe GERD symptoms (49/120 versus 20/101, p < 0.01). Conclusions. Our study showed a high prevalence of GERD and dyspepsia symptoms in Italy. Severe GERD and dyspepsia symptoms were present in at least 13 and 6% of patients, respectively, and they overlapped in at least 6% of the subjects. Our data suggest that these patients should be considered as having functional disorders rather than simple GERD.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/342608
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