OBJECTIVES: Gynecological manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) has been invariably described in association with its extensive form. We have also observed it in a patient with the limited cGVHD form. DESIGN: We here describe our experience of gynecological complications in a population of 30 women who were followed up in a single center 12-120 months after allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) due to hematological malignancies. All of them manifested premature ovarian failure because of the received treatments. RESULTS: Three out of 14 women who were affected by cGVHD developed hematocolpometra after estrogen + progestogen therapy (EPT) introduction, due to uterine and vaginal dystrophy and synecchiae. Extensive cGVHD, including dermal and mucosal localization, was present in two women while the third had only liver involvement. None of our patients had received radiation therapy or had a posttransplant history of infection. Local application of estrogens consistently improved the gynecological complication. However, vaginal synecchiae tended to relapse when local treatment was interrupted, despite no other apparent evidence of active cGVHD. CONCLUSIONS: All women with cGVHD should undergo gynecological examination before introducing EPT, to avoid unpleasant complication as hematocolpometra. Vaginal and cervical synecchiae should be treated with prolonged local treatments, and temporary use of continuous EPT regimens may be preferable in these women. Moreover, close monitoring by pelvic exam and ultrasonography is advisable during the initial cycles to detect any complication caused by possible intrauterine adhesions undetected during the previous gynecological examination.

Estrogen-progestogen induced hematocolpometra following allogeneic stem cell transplant

SELLERI, CARMINE;DI CARLO, COSTANTINO;BIFULCO, GIUSEPPE;LOMBARDI, GAETANO;COLAO, ANNAMARIA;ROTOLI, BRUNO;NAPPI, CARMINE
2004

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Gynecological manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) has been invariably described in association with its extensive form. We have also observed it in a patient with the limited cGVHD form. DESIGN: We here describe our experience of gynecological complications in a population of 30 women who were followed up in a single center 12-120 months after allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) due to hematological malignancies. All of them manifested premature ovarian failure because of the received treatments. RESULTS: Three out of 14 women who were affected by cGVHD developed hematocolpometra after estrogen + progestogen therapy (EPT) introduction, due to uterine and vaginal dystrophy and synecchiae. Extensive cGVHD, including dermal and mucosal localization, was present in two women while the third had only liver involvement. None of our patients had received radiation therapy or had a posttransplant history of infection. Local application of estrogens consistently improved the gynecological complication. However, vaginal synecchiae tended to relapse when local treatment was interrupted, despite no other apparent evidence of active cGVHD. CONCLUSIONS: All women with cGVHD should undergo gynecological examination before introducing EPT, to avoid unpleasant complication as hematocolpometra. Vaginal and cervical synecchiae should be treated with prolonged local treatments, and temporary use of continuous EPT regimens may be preferable in these women. Moreover, close monitoring by pelvic exam and ultrasonography is advisable during the initial cycles to detect any complication caused by possible intrauterine adhesions undetected during the previous gynecological examination.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/337712
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