A-kinase anchor protein 75 (AKAP75) binds regulatory subunits (RIIalpha and RIIbeta) of type II protein kinase A (PKAII) isoforms and targets the resulting complexes to sites in the cytoskeleton that abut the plasma membrane [1-7]. Co-localization of AKAP75-PKAII with adenylate cyclase and PKA substrate/effector proteins in cytoskeleton and plasma membrane effects a physical and functional integration of up-stream and downstream signaling proteins, thereby ensuring efficient propagation of signals carried by locally generated cyclic AMP (cAMP) [4-9]. An important, but previously untested, prediction of the AKAP model is that efficient, cyclic nucleotide-dependent liberation of diffusible PKA catalytic subunits from cytoskeleton-bound AKAP75-PKAII complexes will also enhance signaling to distal organelles, such as the nucleus. We tested this idea by suing HEK-A75 cells, in which PKAII isoforms are immobilized in cortical cytoskeleton by AKAP75. Abilities of HEK-A75 and control cells (with cytoplasmically dispersed PKAII isoforms) to respond to increases in cAMP content were compared. Cells with anchored PKAII exhibited a threefold higher level of nuclear catalytic subunit content and 4-10-fold greater increments in phosphorylation of a regulatory serine residue in cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and in phosphoCREB-stimulated transcription of the c-fos gene. Each effect occurred more rapidly in cells containing targeted AKAP75-PKAII complexes. Thus, anchoring of PKAII in actin cortical cytoskeleton increases the rate, magnitude and sensitivity of cAMP signaling to the nucleus.

A-kinase anchor protein 75 increases the rate and magnitude of cAMP signaling to the nucleus.

FELICIELLO, ANTONIO;AVVEDIMENTO, VITTORIO ENRICO;
1997

Abstract

A-kinase anchor protein 75 (AKAP75) binds regulatory subunits (RIIalpha and RIIbeta) of type II protein kinase A (PKAII) isoforms and targets the resulting complexes to sites in the cytoskeleton that abut the plasma membrane [1-7]. Co-localization of AKAP75-PKAII with adenylate cyclase and PKA substrate/effector proteins in cytoskeleton and plasma membrane effects a physical and functional integration of up-stream and downstream signaling proteins, thereby ensuring efficient propagation of signals carried by locally generated cyclic AMP (cAMP) [4-9]. An important, but previously untested, prediction of the AKAP model is that efficient, cyclic nucleotide-dependent liberation of diffusible PKA catalytic subunits from cytoskeleton-bound AKAP75-PKAII complexes will also enhance signaling to distal organelles, such as the nucleus. We tested this idea by suing HEK-A75 cells, in which PKAII isoforms are immobilized in cortical cytoskeleton by AKAP75. Abilities of HEK-A75 and control cells (with cytoplasmically dispersed PKAII isoforms) to respond to increases in cAMP content were compared. Cells with anchored PKAII exhibited a threefold higher level of nuclear catalytic subunit content and 4-10-fold greater increments in phosphorylation of a regulatory serine residue in cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and in phosphoCREB-stimulated transcription of the c-fos gene. Each effect occurred more rapidly in cells containing targeted AKAP75-PKAII complexes. Thus, anchoring of PKAII in actin cortical cytoskeleton increases the rate, magnitude and sensitivity of cAMP signaling to the nucleus.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/336934
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 13
  • Scopus 61
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 59
social impact