This book deals with the analysis of networks composed of transmission lines and lumped circuits. It is intended for senior and graduate students in electrical engineering. It will also be a useful reference for industrial professionals concerned with computer-aided circuit analysis and design. As far as the transmission line model is concerned, it is assumed that the reader is acquainted with the subject at the level of undergraduate courses in electrical engineering. Introductory courses on transmission line theory deal with the basic concepts of traveling and standing waves, and analyze, in the frequency domain, transmission lines connected to independent sources and impedances. They introduce several basic notions, such as those of characteristic impedance, power flux, reflection coefficients, voltage standing-wave ratio and impedance transformation, tackle the problem of the impedance matching, and teach how to use the Smith chart. However, frequency domain analysis techniques are to no purpose for high-speed electronic circuits and distribution systems of electrical energy, which consist of many and many transmission lines connected to many and many non linear and time-varying lumped circuits. This book concerns the time domain analysis of electrical networks composed of linear time invariant transmission lines and lumped circuits that, in general, can be non linear and/or time varying. The theory of wave propagation in linear time invariant transmission lines, two-conductor or multi-conductor, without losses or with losses, with parameters depending or not on the frequency, uniform or non uniform, is presented in a way that is new, completely general and yet concise. The terminal behavior of these lines is characterized in the time domain through convolution relations with delays. A characterization dealing exclusively with the voltages and currents at the line ends is a prerequisite to tackle the study of networks composed of transmission lines and lumped circuits by way of all those techniques of analysis and computation that are typical of the lumped circuit theory. The most widely used circuit simulator, SPICE, simulates transmission lines by using this approach. Unique feature of this book is the extension of some concepts of the lumped circuit theory, such as those of associated discrete circuit and associated resistive circuit to networks composed of lumped and distributed elements. The qualitative study of the equations relevant to networks composed of transmission lines and lumped circuits is carried out. In particular, it is shown that transmission lines connecting non linear locally active resistors may exhibit fascinating nonlinear phenomena such as bifurcations and chaos.

Transmission lines and lumped circuits

MIANO, GIOVANNI;MAFFUCCI, ANTONIO
2001

Abstract

This book deals with the analysis of networks composed of transmission lines and lumped circuits. It is intended for senior and graduate students in electrical engineering. It will also be a useful reference for industrial professionals concerned with computer-aided circuit analysis and design. As far as the transmission line model is concerned, it is assumed that the reader is acquainted with the subject at the level of undergraduate courses in electrical engineering. Introductory courses on transmission line theory deal with the basic concepts of traveling and standing waves, and analyze, in the frequency domain, transmission lines connected to independent sources and impedances. They introduce several basic notions, such as those of characteristic impedance, power flux, reflection coefficients, voltage standing-wave ratio and impedance transformation, tackle the problem of the impedance matching, and teach how to use the Smith chart. However, frequency domain analysis techniques are to no purpose for high-speed electronic circuits and distribution systems of electrical energy, which consist of many and many transmission lines connected to many and many non linear and time-varying lumped circuits. This book concerns the time domain analysis of electrical networks composed of linear time invariant transmission lines and lumped circuits that, in general, can be non linear and/or time varying. The theory of wave propagation in linear time invariant transmission lines, two-conductor or multi-conductor, without losses or with losses, with parameters depending or not on the frequency, uniform or non uniform, is presented in a way that is new, completely general and yet concise. The terminal behavior of these lines is characterized in the time domain through convolution relations with delays. A characterization dealing exclusively with the voltages and currents at the line ends is a prerequisite to tackle the study of networks composed of transmission lines and lumped circuits by way of all those techniques of analysis and computation that are typical of the lumped circuit theory. The most widely used circuit simulator, SPICE, simulates transmission lines by using this approach. Unique feature of this book is the extension of some concepts of the lumped circuit theory, such as those of associated discrete circuit and associated resistive circuit to networks composed of lumped and distributed elements. The qualitative study of the equations relevant to networks composed of transmission lines and lumped circuits is carried out. In particular, it is shown that transmission lines connecting non linear locally active resistors may exhibit fascinating nonlinear phenomena such as bifurcations and chaos.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/204782
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