Experimental hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia have been shown to affect vascular reactivity. Chronic red wine consumption is associated with less cardiovascular mortality. Whether ingestion of a natural meal and red wine causes acute changes in vascular homeostasis is poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to clarify whether meal ingestion, with and without red wine, exert acute effects on vascular reactivity in healthy humans. We studied vascular reactivity and forearm nitrite balance in 10 healthy subjects under 3 different circumstances: (1) fasting; (2) after ingestion of a standard natural meal (1,050 kcal); and (3) after the same meal enriched with a glass of red wine. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF) by strain-gauge plethismography during intrabrachial, graded infusion of acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (NP), and norepinephrine (NE). We also measured the forearm balance of nitrite before and during ACh infusion. Despite significant increases in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, the vasodilatory response to Ach and NP after meal ingestion was not different from the fasting response. Similarly, the vasoconstrictory response to NE was similar postprandially and during fasting. Addition of red wine did not modify the response to any of the vasoactive agents. Finally, the forearm nitrite production during Ach infusion was not different in the 3 experimental settings. Food intake, whether associated or not with red wine, does not affect vascular reactivity in normal human subjects.

Food and red wine do not exert acute effects on vascular reactivity.

NAPOLI, RAFFAELE;GUARDASOLE, VINCENZO;ANGELINI, VALENTINA;CAPASSO, ANNAMARIA;ZARRA, EMANUELA;CITTADINI, ANTONIO;MATARAZZO, MARGHERITA;SACCA', LUIGI
2004

Abstract

Experimental hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia have been shown to affect vascular reactivity. Chronic red wine consumption is associated with less cardiovascular mortality. Whether ingestion of a natural meal and red wine causes acute changes in vascular homeostasis is poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to clarify whether meal ingestion, with and without red wine, exert acute effects on vascular reactivity in healthy humans. We studied vascular reactivity and forearm nitrite balance in 10 healthy subjects under 3 different circumstances: (1) fasting; (2) after ingestion of a standard natural meal (1,050 kcal); and (3) after the same meal enriched with a glass of red wine. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF) by strain-gauge plethismography during intrabrachial, graded infusion of acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (NP), and norepinephrine (NE). We also measured the forearm balance of nitrite before and during ACh infusion. Despite significant increases in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, the vasodilatory response to Ach and NP after meal ingestion was not different from the fasting response. Similarly, the vasoconstrictory response to NE was similar postprandially and during fasting. Addition of red wine did not modify the response to any of the vasoactive agents. Finally, the forearm nitrite production during Ach infusion was not different in the 3 experimental settings. Food intake, whether associated or not with red wine, does not affect vascular reactivity in normal human subjects.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/201477
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