Despite encouraging progresses achieved in the management of viral diseases, efficient strategies to counteract infections are still required. The current global challenge highlighted the need to develop a rapid and cost-effective strategy to counteract the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Lipid metabolism plays a crucial role in viral infections. Viruses can use the host lipid machinery to support their life cycle and to impair the host immune response. The altered expression of mevalonate pathway-related genes, induced by several viruses, assures survival and spread in host tissue. In some infections, statins, HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors, reduce cholesterol in the plasma membrane of permissive cells resulting in lower viral titers and failure to internalize the virus. Statins can also counteract viral infections through their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects. Beyond statins, interfering with the mevalonate pathway could have an adjuvant effect in therapies aimed at mitigating endothelial dysfunction and deregulated inflammation in viral infection. In this review we depicted the historical and current evidence highlighting how lipid homeostasis and mevalonate pathway targeting represents a valid approach to rapidly neutralize viruses, focusing our attention to their potential use as effective targets to hinder SARS-CoV-2 morbidity and mortality. Pros and cons of statins and Mevalonate-pathway inhibitors have been also dissected.

Lipid homeostasis and mevalonate pathway in COVID-19: Basic concepts and potential therapeutic targets / Proto, M. C.; Fiore, D.; Piscopo, C.; Pagano, C.; Galgani, M.; Bruzzaniti, S.; Laezza, C.; Gazzerro, P.; Bifulco, M.. - In: PROGRESS IN LIPID RESEARCH. - ISSN 0163-7827. - 82:(2021), p. 101099. [10.1016/j.plipres.2021.101099]

Lipid homeostasis and mevalonate pathway in COVID-19: Basic concepts and potential therapeutic targets

Pagano C.;Galgani M.;Gazzerro P.;Bifulco M.
2021

Abstract

Despite encouraging progresses achieved in the management of viral diseases, efficient strategies to counteract infections are still required. The current global challenge highlighted the need to develop a rapid and cost-effective strategy to counteract the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Lipid metabolism plays a crucial role in viral infections. Viruses can use the host lipid machinery to support their life cycle and to impair the host immune response. The altered expression of mevalonate pathway-related genes, induced by several viruses, assures survival and spread in host tissue. In some infections, statins, HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors, reduce cholesterol in the plasma membrane of permissive cells resulting in lower viral titers and failure to internalize the virus. Statins can also counteract viral infections through their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects. Beyond statins, interfering with the mevalonate pathway could have an adjuvant effect in therapies aimed at mitigating endothelial dysfunction and deregulated inflammation in viral infection. In this review we depicted the historical and current evidence highlighting how lipid homeostasis and mevalonate pathway targeting represents a valid approach to rapidly neutralize viruses, focusing our attention to their potential use as effective targets to hinder SARS-CoV-2 morbidity and mortality. Pros and cons of statins and Mevalonate-pathway inhibitors have been also dissected.
2021
Lipid homeostasis and mevalonate pathway in COVID-19: Basic concepts and potential therapeutic targets / Proto, M. C.; Fiore, D.; Piscopo, C.; Pagano, C.; Galgani, M.; Bruzzaniti, S.; Laezza, C.; Gazzerro, P.; Bifulco, M.. - In: PROGRESS IN LIPID RESEARCH. - ISSN 0163-7827. - 82:(2021), p. 101099. [10.1016/j.plipres.2021.101099]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/872099
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